CQU Project Management education

The importance of effective knowledge management and conversion—Alice Chivell

The importance of effective knowledge management and conversion: A reflective paper drawing on lessons learnt from a case example

This paper highlights the challenges projects can face when there is not sufficient monitoring, planning and action taken regarding knowledge management and conversion. Explicit knowledge is seldom enough in the project management arena and tacit knowledge is also required for optimum performance. Tacit knowledge comes from a combination of experience, values, context and intuition and is not easily or readily shared. This paper uses a case example to highlight project setbacks and barriers experienced when important tacit knowledge is not effectively harnessed, converted and shared amongst the project team. Reflecting on the case example, the lessons learnt and actions taken, provides examples of how projects with knowledge conversion issues can overcome the barriers and improve performance. The paper discusses the complexities of power, insecurity and trust when it comes to harnessing and sharing knowledge and ways to address this. It explores a systematic and deliberate way to effectively manage knowledge, drawing on models and processes such as the SECI Knowledge Conversion Process. The paper concludes by discussing the advantages and disadvantages of knowledge management and conversion in projects, acknowledging that despite challenges a focus on these processes ultimately leads to performance improvement and increased project success.

Author: Alice Chivell
Review status: Postgraduate assignment (University of Technology Sydney)

February 18, 2018

Synergy between tacit and explicit knowledge—Andrew Dahal

Synergy between tacit and explicit knowledge: Key to effective project management, a case of Nepal

In projects undertaken in a country like Nepal, specifically in the construction sector, the idea of knowledge management has been a burning issue for a considerable amount of time. Standard project management practices in Nepal being at the early stages, the idea of accommodating tacit and explicit knowledge with a view to assisting project managers and their team in better managing the projects is proposed which is also viewed as being able to set an example for the upcoming project leaders. Significant number of researches have shown the benefit of synergy between tacit and explicit knowledge in case of project setting and also in organizational setting as well. Despite the differences that occur among the subject matter experts working together in projects, consideration of how knowledge is acquired and how the context of the situation could play a decisive role in people applying their knowledge into action paves a way for effective project management. The paper focuses on the reflection of an event that had occurred in a construction project in Nepal and addresses how consideration of use of both tacit and explicit knowledge would have helped to improve the situation. Also the paper briefly highlights the mindset of project managers in a high-power distance culture and its effect on the execution of projects.

Author: Andrew Dahal
Review status: Postgraduate assignment (University of Technology Sydney)

June 12, 2016